alexconall: the Pleiades (Default)
Alex Conall, social justice bard ([personal profile] alexconall) wrote2013-08-09 12:52 am

Green and Blue [sponsored by [livejournal.com profile] book_worm5 from July Fiction Fishbowl]

Kaimana presses the bamboo stamp onto the unevenly flattened kapa cloth, applies green dye to a second stamp, presses the stamp to the cloth, applies blue dye to the first stamp, presses the stamp to the cloth. She is silent; sometimes she will hum as she works with her spindle and loom and dye pot, usually popular melodies that keep her brain distracted trying to remember the English lyrics, but not today. Today she needs to focus on the pattern, and the color, and the unfamiliar cloth.

Does color matter for this, or is that a foreign thing? she wonders. If foreign, well, Kaimana's part Asian and part white though Grandmother's mostly Native Hawaiian, so the magic should work for her even if it's not well suited to the art she's using as channel for the power. (She should be using what she knows, what she is expert at, but she thinks Grandmother would appreciate it less.) Green for health, blue for peace, green for health, blue for peace; the natural white of the bark cloth itself also suits the peace Kaimana hopes to give.

The patterns on the stamps have meanings, but Kaimana does not know more than a few of them. No one does. She hopes she's chosen one that won't conflict with what she means to do. But magic is intent, in many ways; the pattern might not help but shouldn't hurt.

Grandmother is ill. Green for health, blue for peace; Grandmother needs at least one of the two.


Creative Commons License
Green and Blue by Elizabeth Conall is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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